Coronary Calcium Scan Illuminates Heart Disease Risk

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When I told my cardiologist that nearly every adult in my family takes a statin due to a family history of high cholesterol, he asked if anyone had ever undergone a Coronary Calcium Scan.

I’d never heard of that test, and none of my relatives had either.

But I paid out-of-pocket for that test last month.

The reason: my cholesterol results worsened slightly versus a year ago. My latest Cardio IQ blood test* revealed a high number of LDL (bad) cholesterol particles, and that these LDL particles had shifted from the ‘safe,’ fluffy Pattern A type to the more dangerous,

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Cholesterol Treatment – Guidelines Pocket Cards for Doctors

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Did you know that any old person (and by ‘any old’ I mean a regular, non-doctor person, not any OLD person!) can purchase the American Heart Association’s “guidelines pocket cards” meant to keep doctors up to date on latest treatment protocols/recommendations?

On the American Heart Association website, these pocket cards are described as:

“These quick reference tools provide instant access to current AHA/ASA and ACCF/AHA guidelines in a clear, concise format – available in print and in the Guideline Central Mobile app for iPhone, iPad and Android.”

For months, I have been wondering whether there have been any updates or changes to the November 2013 Cholesterol Guidelines –

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New Cholesterol Guidelines – An App For That

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The American Heart Association and the America College of Cardiology released completely new, totally different guidelines for the treatment of high blood cholesterol back in November 2013.

As explained in my post, The NEW Guidelines For Cholesterol-Lowering Statin Meds, in broad strokes the new guidelines state that if you are in one of the following four groups you have elevated heart disease risk and should take statins:

  • those who already have cardiovascular disease
  • anyone with LDL (bad) cholesterol of 190 mg/dL or higher
  • anyone between 40 and 75 years of age who has Type 2 diabetes
  • people between 40 and 75 who have an estimated 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease of 7.5 percent or higher.
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