New Cholesterol Guidelines – An App For That

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The American Heart Association and the America College of Cardiology released completely new, totally different guidelines for the treatment of high blood cholesterol back in November 2013.

As explained in my post, The NEW Guidelines For Cholesterol-Lowering Statin Meds, in broad strokes the new guidelines state that if you are in one of the following four groups you have elevated heart disease risk and should take statins:

  1. those who already have cardiovascular disease
  2. anyone with LDL (bad) cholesterol of 190 mg/dL or higher
  3. anyone between 40 and 75 years of age who has Type 2 diabetes
  4. people between 40 and 75 who have an estimated 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease of 7.5 percent or higher.

To determine your personal 10-year risk of cardiac disease, the new guidelines included an online calculator * … and now that a few months have passed, there’s even AN APP FOR THAT (links to the app are on the online calculator webpage – or search ‘ASCVD Risk” in iTunes store). I downloaded the app for my iPhone and it’s quite handy as it saves your data and also provides articles about key topics like ‘diet and physical activity recommendations,’ and ‘common cardiovascular terms,’ and the like – right in the app.
* NOTE – if the link does not work, check for an updated link on my RESOURCES page.

One of the more interesting topics I found inside the app (in the Patients’ Blood Cholesterol Management Recommendations tab) discussed additional blood tests. After reviewing with your doctor your ‘lifetime risk estimate’ based on the inputs in the calculator/app, the article stated there were three additional tests your doctor may want to order:  Coronary Artery Calcium (CAC), High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and Ankle-Branchial Index (ABI).

The Coronary Artery Calcium test was one my doctor had talked with me about a few years ago. She asked me to find out whether anyone in my family (all of whom take a statin to manage high cholesterol) had had a Coronary Artery Calcium test done, and if so, what the results were. I failed at that. Apparently, I need to email all my cousins and aunts and uncles.  Today.

As I wrote about in Cholesterol Tests Your Doctor Hasn’t Told You About, the C-Reactive Protein test is a test (along with apo-B) that I would really like done to truly understand my cardiac risk. CRP is a measure of inflammation in the body and high levels have been associated with heart disease.  But my doctor declined to order either test for me back a year or two ago – said with my just-over-220 total cholesterol levels, I didn’t need these tests.

The Ankle-Branchial Index I’ve never heard of before. According to the ASCVD Risk app, ABI measures “the ratio of the blood pressure in the ankle compared to blood pressure in the arm, which can predict peripheral artery disease (PAD).”

So I will have to ask my doctor again about Coronary Artery Calcium, CRP, apo-B and ABI testing. I feel sure she won’t agree to this testing because my newly calculated lifetime risk is far below the 7.5% risk that indicates statin medication is needed.

That said, these tests are at least mentioned within the new guidelines, while others, like Non-HDL cholesterol are now no longer viewed as vital to determining cardiac disease risk and treatment plans. So even though my risk is low under the new guidelines and I am no longer in the group that should be taking statins, I want to ask about whether these tests might provide further insight into cardiac risk.

If you haven’t read about the new guidelines or found the new online calculator intimidating, download the new app.* Knowing your cardiac risk before you talk to your doctor will give you more confidence to ask questions about your risk of cardiac disease at your next appointment.

* You can’t use the calculator/app if you already have cardiac disease or take statins. If that’s you, best bet is to talk with your doctor about what the new guidelines mean for you and/or if a change in your statin medication is warranted.

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