Don’t Like Oatmeal? Try Chickpeas!

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Every morning I feel guilty as I eat my half-bagel with a smidge of whipped cream cheese and fresh lox – guilty because I know I should be eating that miracle breakfast food, oatmeal. I know oatmeal has a lot of dietary fiber, and dietary fiber reduces cholesterol. But I just don’t care for oatmeal all that much.

So imagine my surprise when I learned while researching for my Answers.com article, Chickpeas Help Lower Cholesterol (who knew?!) that chickpeas have a lot of dietary fiber. And I mean A LOT.

Like, MORE THAN OATMEAL!

Huh!

Why didn’t my doctor mention this?

She did say to eat a lot more fiber. She did say to eat oatmeal and fresh vegetables and take Metamucil.  But nary a word about chickpeas.

Which is a bummer because I can easily pop open a can of chickpeas and toss a handful in a salad. I’m far more likely to do that than eat oatmeal (Yes, I know – I always write about how I don’t like salad. That said, I am having far, far more success eating salad for lunch than I’ve ever had eating oatmeal for breakfast!)

So I did a little more research – and guess what? A mere half-cup of canned chickpeas packs 5 grams of dietary fiber, compared to 4 grams of that pain-to-make steel cut oatmeal (!) and 3 grams of fiber in instant oatmeal packets. The only oatmeal with more dietary fiber than chickpeas is that new Quaker Instant High Fiber Oatmeal (which I haven’t yet tried but guess I should?)

Check out this nutritional comparison I did using the Quaker site — comparing 1 serving of three different Quaker Oatmeals with 1 serving of Eden Organic canned chickpeas (the Goya and Progresso sites did not have all the nutritional info but I’m betting it’s similar). My guess is that you’ll join me in both searching the web for hummus recipes and popping chickpeas into your salads.

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One thought on “Don’t Like Oatmeal? Try Chickpeas!

  1. Okay, I’m already a chickpea fan, so that’s not a problem, but what about breakfast? Before you answer…I have a a solution. Home-made granola with lots of great, cholesterol-lowering ingredients (and you can add others, plus modify the sugar/fat content). I love the granola recipe on thepioneerwoman.com.

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