Roasted Butternut Squash and Mushroom Curry

My interest was piqued by David Tanis’ New York Times article, A Warming Curry for Fall— because this accomplished chef mentioned that he’d adapted a Madhur Jaffrey recipe. I find her recipes can be challenging, so I was thrilled at a Mr. Tanis modification.

This recipe was both heavenly and easy—one of the most delicious recipes I’ve made. Plus, it truly took only about 30 minutes (not including roasting time – and you can make it without roasting the butternut squash if you have 30 minutes max).

Not only that, but the resulting dinner is a great vegetarian option—not always my forte but one I am trying to tackle—and it was filling. And as I served with brown jasmine rice, it was even a decent source of cholesterol-lowering fiber.

I read through the many comments online and decided to modify Mr. Tanis’ recipe right off the bat to add more flavor. (See the NYT article link above for the original recipe.) I’ve included mine with adaptions below.  It’s very flavorful but not at all spicy – the only tricky part will be getting curry leaves (available at Indian markets and online) first.  While Mr. Tanis says curry leaves are optional, they really make the dish.

My modifications were to add ground cumin, garam masala and also Maharajah Style Curry Powder By Penzeys Spices. Yes, I know that ‘curry’ is a catch-all and that many of the ingredients are listed both separately and in this curry powder.  But the recipe was delicious with these additions and I love Penzey’s curry.

As for rice, I served it with Trader Joes Brown Jasmine Rice for a fiber boost.

The picture above I took while it was cooking, and my version of the recipe follows. Don’t be daunted by the number of ingredients—nearly all are just spices!  And I didn’t even bother with wild mushrooms: I used sliced Baby Bellas and Shitakes … and didn’t measure them, just used 2 packs from Trader Joe’s.

It’s simple, I promise! If you like curry you will want to give this recipe a try.

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Roasted Butternut Squash and Mushroom Curry - Going Lo-Co adaption of David Tanis recipe
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Total Time
30 mins
 

Delicious, easy vegetarian curry published by David Tanis in the New York Times. Mr. Tanis adapted his recipe from a Madhur Jaffrey, and I've slightly modified further, for more flavor and cholesterol-lowering fiber. 

Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Indian
Servings: 4 people
Calories: 482 kcal
Author: David Tanis, adapted by Karen Swanson
Ingredients
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil or canola oil
  • 10 ounces butternut or other winter squash peeled and diced in 1/2-inch cubes
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 or 2 small whole green chiles such as jalapeño or serrano
  • 3 medium shallots or 1 small onion finely diced. I use already-diced fresh onions and diced more finely
  • ½ teaspoon black or yellow mustard seeds
  • ½ teaspoon cumin seeds
  • Handful of fresh or frozen curry leaves
  • 4 garlic cloves minced
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • Pinch of cayenne
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon garam masala
  • 1/2 teaspoon curry powder
  • 1 pound mushrooms preferably a mix of cultivated and wild, trimmed and sliced 1/8-inch thick
  • ¾ cup coconut milk
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice freshly squeezed
  • Cilantro sprigs for garnish
  • 2 cup brown jasmine rice
Instructions
  1. Cook about 2 cups of brown rice or brown jasmine rice so it will done when curry is done.

  2. While you can follow directions for cooking the squash cubes on the stovetop, I prefer to slick with olive oil, salt and pepper and roast them at 425 degrees for 20-30 minutes (then add to pan after the mushrooms.) To me, this is so easy and boosts flavor depth - you just have to time it so they are roasted before you start cooking.

  3. If roasting squash, skip to next step. Otherwise, cook squash: In a wide skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat. When hot, add squash cubes in one layer. Season with salt and pepper. Cook for about 2 minutes, letting cubes brown slightly, then flip and cook for 2 minutes more. Use a slotted spoon to lift squash out, and set aside.

  4. Cut a lengthwise slit in each chile to open it, but leave whole. (This allows the heat and flavor of the chile to release into the sauce without making it too spicy.)
  5. Add shallots or diced onion to skillet, salt lightly and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Add mustard seeds, cumin seeds and curry leaves and let sizzle for 30 seconds, then add garlic, coriander, cayenne, turmeric and chiles. Stir well and cook for 30 seconds more. (I did both of these steps for 1 minute)
  6. Add mushrooms to pan, season with salt and toss to coat. Continue to cook, stirring, until mushrooms begin to soften, about 5 minutes.
  7. Return squash cubes to pan, stir in coconut milk and bring to a simmer. Lower heat to medium and simmer for another 5 minutes. If mixture looks dry, thin with a little water. Taste and season with salt.
  8. Just before serving, stir in lime juice. 

  9. Serve atop high-fiber brown rice. Garnish with cilantro leaves - don't leave this out, it adds a lot of flavor.

Recipe Notes

Nutritional Data calculated using My Fitness Pal.

Nutrition Facts
Roasted Butternut Squash and Mushroom Curry - Going Lo-Co adaption of David Tanis recipe
Amount Per Serving
Calories 482 Calories from Fat 108
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 12g 18%
Saturated Fat 2g 10%
Polyunsaturated Fat 7g
Monounsaturated Fat 2g
Sodium 18mg 1%
Potassium 105mg 3%
Total Carbohydrates 87g 29%
Dietary Fiber 6g 24%
Sugars 5g
Protein 9g 18%
Vitamin A 23%
Vitamin C 22%
Calcium 11%
Iron 12%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
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Steamed Whole Fish

It seems many people find fish hard to cook — or fear it’ll be ‘smelly.’ But both are so far from the truth! To me, baking or grilling fish is one of the easiest (and healthiest) dinners possible, and I’ve never suffered a fishy-smelling kitchen. If you’re game to try for the first time, the simple overall cooking concept is to slick with oil and bake at high heat for about 10-15 minutes.

Prefer more specific directions to bake a piece of fish?  To bake Arctic Char, Salmon – basically any reasonably thick (1/2″ or more) fillet — all you do is this:

  • Preheat oven to 450. Place a thick piece of Arctic Char or Salmon (or any fillet) on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper or foil; if 1 end of fish is thin, tuck it under.
  • Generously salt the fish and sprinkle with fresh pepper to taste.
  • Slick on some olive oil – just enough to barely cover entire fillet.
  • Sprinkle on a bit fresh or dried herbs (oregano, thyme, rosemary, etc)
  • Bake for 12-15 minutes. Serve with lemon wedges.

If you want something ‘fancier’ you can find many fish recipes on my Lo-Co Recipe page; here are a few quick links to blog posts with recipes and directions:

While preparing fish using any of these methods is easy, quick and delicious, steaming a whole fish is another story. While steamed whole fish is terrifically healthy and an amazing presentation for serving guests (you cook the fish right in the dish you’ll serve it in!) it can be a bit more complicated … leftovers and bones can emit that fishy smell.

But it’s so worth it. And really fun to do with guests. We steamed a whole red snapper with our friends Chris and Dave on the eve of Christmas Eve this year – it was a fun to prepare together, and incredibly tasty.

I’d tried steaming a whole fish once before using a bamboo steamer and following David Tanis’ Steamed Whole Fish recipe – and though it was delicious, it was a fail in concept as I had to make it using a fillet as a whole fish didn’t fit in my steamer. (Read my The Trick To Steaming Whole Fish post about Mr. Tanis’ reply to my twitter query!)

After unearthing a very large pan with both a lid and a rack insert from my ‘magic closet’ I realized I now had the tools to try steaming a whole fish again. I re-read Mr. Tanis’ directions and actually watched (I never do this!) a Martha Stewart video that’s embedded on her Steamed Whole Fish page – and essentially prepared it using Martha’s recipe. The recipe is on that page too; I created a PDF of Martha’s recipe.

First, I bought a 2 1/2 pound wild-caught whole red snapper. I asked my favorite fish monger, Pagano’s, to prepare it as Martha’s video suggested: they descaled it and removed the fins and tail, so all I had to do was rinse and dry it, then lay it on the serving platter I was going to cook it on. It was helpful to watch Martha’s video, but they natter on for a long time about other things, so here’s a tip: they start talking about this fish recipe at about 3 minutes into the video; at about 6 minutes in they talk about the ingredients and at about 7:50 they talk about the fish preparation. Frustratingly, they never talk about serving it, which would have been incredibly helpful…

Then, I made my ‘mise en place,’ following what Martha and her accomplice did at about 6 minutes – because her actual written directions don’t explain/follow what they do in the video (sigh, I hate when that happens). This takes a while and you’ll want to do this before taking your fish out of the refrigerator! Then we added the ingredients to the platter and placed the platter (carefully) onto the rack set inside the very large roasting pan with an inch of boiling water we had set to go on the stovetop. If you look closely, you can see the steam rising above the top of the platter! Then we covered the roasting pan with its lid (if like Martha you are using a roasting pan with no lid, you’d cover the fish with parchment THEN tightly cover that with foil – you can’t have foil touching the fish!)

Twenty-five minutes later, (about 10 minutes per pound) and straight out of the pan, it looked like this:

 

 

 

 

 

 

We then pulled the fish from the bones – and served it like this (you’ll notice only cilantro and scallions atop the fish – the ginger and lemongrass and other ingredients were just ‘aromatics’ – they don’t get served!):

 

 

 

 

 

 

With this of course (yes, that’s all that was left of the first bottle of white wine we drank while cooking the fish!):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s worth watching the Marta Stewart video for pointers, and here’s the full recipe in a PDF format, Steamed Whole Fish, that I modified to include directions they left off the website recipe. Give it a whirl – wrap up the bones tightly or they will smell (better yet, make fish stock – but who am I kidding, I’d never bother!)  And of course, always best to do all your slicing before you drink the wine. (That was a lesson learned the hard way for me.)

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No Pots To Clean Gourmet Dinner

At our annual Cape Cod family vacation, I am responsible for serving the annual Fish Dinner for 10-15 people (there is also the annual Steak Dinner and the annual Lobster & Ribs Dinner, hosted by my brothers-in-law along with, The-Night-Everyone-Arrives-Baked-Ziti-Dinner my now 90-year-old mother-in-law whips up.)

Let’s be clear. Cooking for a very large group in an ill-equipped ‘cottage’ kitchen and serving it as a sit-down dinner in a too-small dining room is NO VACATION. It’s actually a potential nightmare. But it’s what we do. Every year. And once dinner’s on the table, it’s a blast… Plus, my wine-collector brother-in-law brings a LOT of wine so that’s, um, great. (I make sure to finish with all knife skills before imbibing – that’s another story that ends at the hospital).

Anyway, we’ve been doing this for years, but last Thursday I faced a fish dinner crisis: the only feasible date was our last night at the Cape – and we had to pack up our rental house and be on the road by 7:30 the next morning. I tried for a fish dinner hiatus. No dice (a huge compliment yet also frustrating). So I agreed to with one condition: I would cook but I would NOT host 12 people in the rental house that we were in the midst of packing up.

Once that was swiftly agreed upon, I had to devise a dinner plan. Usually my goal is a new variation on fish everyone will like. This year, my goal was: how to cook a full dinner for 12 with very little clean up. Like, none. Else we’d never finish packing and get out on time.

The answer: I devised a menu that required NO pots. Thus no clean up, and no ferrying pots, pans and serving utensils to and fro.

Amazingly, it was a huge success – both the cooking and the quick clean-up… but also, the dinner itself. There were actual accolades! My mother-in-law declared it, “your best fish dinner ever,” and someone dubbed it, “totally gourmet.” There were no leftovers and literally, we had NOTHING to clean up – all we had to do was load the plates and cutlery into the dishwasher. Oh, and the very many wine glasses.

The trick: a dinner plan that relied on heavy duty aluminum foil on the grill, sequential cook times, and ‘sauces’ prepared in advance.

Here’s what I prepared:

  • 2.5 pounds of Arctic Char and 1.5 pounds of Haddock that I prepped with olive oil, salt, pepper, herbs, slivered onions and halved cherry tomatoes: grilled in foil and served with two homemade sauces (really, dressings): Green Goddess and Mustard Vinaigrette.  I thought folks would enjoy trying two very different types of fish, which they did. And surprisingly, my favorite, Arctic Char, was the big winner! (See Lo-Co Recipe page for other fish/Arctic Char recipes!)
  • The fantastic “Grilled Potato and Onion Packages” recipe I found on epicurious.
  • Asparagus we grilled in the afternoon and served at room temperature.

IMG_2695Cooking fish in foil on a grill is dead-easy. All you do is place a fish fillet in foil (skin-side down, if it has skin), slick it both sides with olive oil, add salt and pepper and any fresh herbs you like (I used chives, thyme and rosemary). Atop that, squeeze some lemons and place some very thinly sliced lemon along with very thinly sliced onion and halved cherry tomatoes. The only truly ‘obligatory’ ingredient is olive oil and some lemon – but it makes a nice presentation with all these items! Then wrap it TIGHTLY in foil (I double wrapped it) and grill over medium-high or high heat for 10 minutes — longer if it’s a thick fillet. We needed 15-20 minutes for the 3 wrapped fillets. Take them off the grill and transfer to a serving platter – I removed the onion and lemon slices, but placed the tomatoes back on top for a pretty presentation. I like my fish plain but feared others would not, so I served the fish with choice of a Mustard Vinaigrette (David Tanis’ recipe on my Lo-Co Recipe page) and a Green Goddess dressing/dip mix from Penzey’s Spices that I had whipped up in minutes that morning.

The other element we needed to grill at my brother-in-law’s rental home was the phenomenal “Grilled Potato and Onion Packages” recipe I found on epicurious. Read the recipe and reviews online, or recipe PDF is here and also on my Lo-Co Recipes page. These, my husband and I prepped in the afternoon, then brought over 11 packages all ready to go on the grill!  While they’re meant to be served individually I just opened all 11 packages into a large serving bowl – either way is great.  A few notes from my read of the reviews and my experience making this fabulous and fabulously easy recipe:

  • I used baby red potatoes that I washed and left skins on – and cut into small pieces (like eighths!) so they’d cook quickly enough.
  • Instead of white, I used red onions – again cut into very thin slices – about same size as potatoes.
  • Use heavy duty foil – there’s a size that’s the right width the recipe calls for. 
  • Move the packets every 5-7 minutes or so – maybe 3 times for the 30 minutes – but don’t flip them – goal is to move so that no one spot gets too hot and burns.
  • It’s very easy BUT takes time to cut the potatoes and onions – leave plenty of time for all the slicing!
  • Even if you hate mustard, you won’t taste it here… and if you LOVE mustard, you need to increase the amount used.

The whole dinner took 1 hour to cook at my brother-in-law’s rental home (though a few hours to prep — and we did grill asparagus (see below for how) at home first and served it room temperature.) 

Once we landed at my brother-in-law’s I prepped the fish while my husband grilled the potato packets. In the end, it looked like this:

IMG_2698

 

 

IMG_2697Two notes on the finished dishes:

  • The fish fell apart, which doesn’t happen when you bake or cook fish directly on the grill. But it’s juicy and tender, and if you have enough wine, no one will notice.
  • The potato & onion dish looked much more appealing than this photo; I’d had a few glasses of wine by then…

Hope you try!  So easy and healthy and delicious – and no pots to wash!

To grill asparagus: soak for 10 minutes and snap off the tough bottoms, loosely dry, toss with olive oil, salt and pepper and put right onto a medium-high grill for about 10-15 minutes, rolling them to grill evenly.

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Honey Dijon Arctic Char

Last week, I got some bad news which I’m hoping I can turn into good news.

The bad news: my cholesterol has hit a personal high of 267 but more concerning, my triglycerides skyrocketed to 253 (‘goal’ is lower than 150 … and in the 10 lab results I’ve tracked since 2002 my triglycerides have NEVER been over 200.)

Also, I now have some “mild kidney insufficiency” which may be related to what’s driving my triglycerides sky-high: a) a diet too high in sugar, carbs and alcohol; and b) not enough exercise.

It’s this – the poor diet and exercise – that I’m hoping I can turn into good news. Which I may be able to, because when I really considered my actions over the past few months I was appalled. In fact, I was surprised and chagrined to realize that since my October 2015 knee surgery I’ve not jumped back onto my near-daily exercise routine (not even close) … and am binge/stress eating chocolate…and wine. Oh, and my new favorite starch, baked sweet potatoes, is probably not helping.

More on the high triglycerides and kidney problem in a more medically-focused post (once I do a bit more research and discuss more fully with my doctor.) With my medical questions stressing me out and wine not the right choice, I decided on Saturday to start righting the medical ship with a lo-co recipe review.

So we went grocery shopping over the weekend and yesterday I made the only salad dressing I like (mustard vinaigrette a la David Tanis – see my love salad post or see recipe below). Then my husband and I grilled bok choy, baked brussels sprouts, and steamed green beans so we have vegetables to easily toss into dinners this week. He then grilled a steak (I know, right?) while I made a new fish recipe that was AMAZING and so very easy: Honey Dijon Arctic Char.

HoneyDijonArcticCharThis fish recipe is a snap – as for the fish itself, if you prefer salmon go for it: both salmon and char are ‘meaty’ fish so they hold up well on the grill. I whipped up the marinade in five minutes and let it absorb on a plate for just 20 minutes instead of 30. We (OK, my husband) grilled it skin side down on medium heat for 5 minutes, and it was an easy flip for another 2-3 minutes for perfectly cooked fish. As you can see, I served it with low-glycemic quinoa (instead of the baked sweet potato that’s been my go to side for the past six months) and baked brussels sprouts and string beans.  Plus ONE glass of wine (I wanted two but…)

Having never made this before AND despising honey, I wasn’t sure I’d like this so I didn’t bother measuring the ingredients. Thus, I was absolutely astonished at how tasty this was. Click the link for recipe details (and for ingredients for 4), which I’ve cut roughly in half, and summarized here:

Honey Dijon Arctic Char / Salmon: for 2-3 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 large filet of arctic char or salmon, skin on – about 3/4 pound (for 2-3 people, or to have leftovers!)
  • 1/8 cup dijon mustard (I didn’t really measure this)
  • 1/8 cup honey (or this)
  • 1 TB extra virgin olive oil (or this)
  • 2 cloves of garlic – supposed to be minced, I put through garlic press
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme (again, no measuring)
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper (didn’t measure, used black pepper)
  • juice of half lemon (plus more for serving, if desired)

Directions:

  • Combine mustard, honey, oil, garlic, thyme, lemon juice, salt, and pepper. Using a spoon, coat fillet (both sides) with mixture (if not enough for skin, just throw some olive oil under it). Cover dish with plastic wrap and place into refrigerator for 30 minutes (I just let it sit on counter instead for 20 minutes).
  • On grill pre-heated to about medium, place fish, skin side down (on a fish screen) and cook for 5 minutes. Carefully, turn fish and cook for an additional 3-5 minutes. (It’ll  be done – you can tell it is if the flesh of the fish no longer appears shiny and flakes easily). Remove from grill and serve – with a little extra lemon juice if desired.

Thank you to Derrick Riches on bbq.about.com for the recipe and inspiration. I cannot WAIT to have this fish again tonight. And maybe again for lunch tomorrow – in a salad with my homemade mustard vinaigrette – recipe again here:

Mustard Vinaigrette a la David Tanis– for a TRIPLE recipe: 2 TB Dijon mustard, 6 TB Sherry Vinegar, some finely grated garlic (I use 2 cloves – the recipe asks for 1 1/2 teaspoons) and 9 TB EVOO, salt and pepper to taste. To make: whisk together mustard, vinegar and garlic. Whisk in olive oil. Season with salt & pepper.  Pour into carafe and refrigerate.

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Heart Healthy Tomato Sauce Recipe

If you still have tomatoes left over from this summer’s amazing tomato season, you might want to give fresh tomato sauce a try.

I know, I know. It seems hard. And it’s so much easier to pour sauce from a jar.

But it’s not, actually. Well, OK, it is. But not that much harder, it turns out!  A few weeks ago, I read David Tanis’ NYT article, The Time Is Right To Make Tomato Sauce and my eyes flew to the 6 gorgeous tomatoes my friend Chris had given me (which truth be told, had been sitting on my counter for longer than I’d like to admit.)

Could this solve my, ‘I don’t know what to do with that tomato bounty’ dilemma? I decided to try it – spurred to action by these phrases Mr. Tanis used in describing his recipe:

  • “just make a small-batch” and “in a matter of minutes”
  • “quick-cooking sauce with relatively fast preparation. There’s no need to blanch and peel tomatoes or even use a food mill”
  • “All you need is a hand-held grater”

Quick and easy — check that as an ‘always’ requirement for me.  And while I normally like to use equipment, I do not own a food mill and I could not quite imagine how one attacks a tomato with a hand-held grater!

Plus, tomatoes are heart healthy. In fact, a study published in 2007 by the The National Center for Biotechnology Information is actually titled, “Tomato juice decreases LDL cholesterol levels and increases LDL resistance to oxidation.”  As I despise tomato juice and don’t get enough tomatoes in my diet, I thought I should pop a Prilosec and try this dinner.

And I’m glad I did.  While the sauce was a little thin flavor-wise (which would be great for kids / picky eaters) it was very fresh and light – a terrific change of pace from jarred sauce. Plus, I love learning a new cooking technique – and well, OK, using a grater isn’t actually a cooking ‘technique; but still, I’d never done it and didn’t quite believe it could work.

I mean, what does it mean, actually, to grate a tomato? Bizarre, right? Turns out it was easy and actually does work. Here’s how Mr. Tanis describes it in his Quick Fresh Tomato Sauce recipe – and it’s totally accurate: “Cut the tomatoes in halves or quarters. Squeeze out the seeds, or don’t (I never mind a few seeds in the sauce). Place the cut side against the large holes of the grater and gently rub until only the tomato skin remains in your hand.”  It actually worked and I was surprised to find it was kind of fun.

Here’s what it looked like while I was grating – and the resulting flat tomato skin, which made me giggle as it reminded me of Flat Stanley.

TomatoGrating TomatoesGrated

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There’s a second recipe – for how to make the pasta dish using this quick fresh tomato sauce. Pasta With Fresh Tomato Sauce And Ricotta was an equally easy recipe and quite tasty.  It also held up well for lunch the next day – a winner in my book. Plus, the ricotta adds protein so this is a good meat-less dinner option, with the heart-healthy benefits of lycopene.

If you have fresh from the garden, sun-ripened tomatoes on hand, give this a whirl.  The recipe calls for 5 pounds of tomatoes which is A LOT – so I made a half batch and that worked fine.

BTW – in case you’re like me and don’t know how many tomatoes are in a pound, I looked it up. It’s about 3 ‘medium’ tomatoes to a pound. I had 6 tomatoes so halved the recipe – which isn’t exactly the right proportions, but exact measurements are not vital in this kind of recipe – close is good enough (which is why I much prefer cooking to baking!)

PastaFreshSauceRicotta_TanisHere’s how mine turned out – as I said, it was a little mild on taste (next time I’ll up the garlic and the red pepper!) and both my husband and I enjoyed it.

Click on the recipe links to see Mr. Tanis’ original article (with beautiful photos) or my recipe page has both of these recipes downloadable as a PDF: Pasta With Fresh Tomato Sauce and Ricotta…including Fresh Tomato Sauce.

 

 

 

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