Non-Sweetened Metamucil with Grapefruit and Orange Juice

With my cholesterol, triglycerides and blood pressure higher last month, I needed to try to salvage things before my doctor(s) advise statins and/or blood pressure medication. Step one: a lo-co lifestyle exercise and diet review (and correction):

  • Exercise. I’d let my exercise habit lapse in the past six months, so have recently re-started exercising daily. Of course today I pulled my hamstring. Sigh. But I am determined to at least walk daily, because ‘Study Proves Exercise Staves Off Bad Cholesterol.’
  • Diet – General. While I don’t eat a lot of red meat, I do eat a lot of carbs (pasta and bread) and sugar (M&Ms and wine). So I’m cutting down on pasta, pizza and sticking with 1 glass of rose per night. And M&Ms, well…not sure how they got back into my diet but it ends now.
  • Diet – Supplements. As with exercise, I had stopped my daily dose of Metamucil. Which is lame, because Metamucil both lowers cholesterol and helps with diverticulosis, which I also have. So I tossed my very expired Metamucil and bought a new, huge jar of Orange Smooth Metamucil, with sugar.

Metamucil_SugarThen I got to thinking about that Metamucil. I chose Orange Smooth Metamucil (with sugar) because I both despise aspartame and believe it to be unhealthy. As all the sugar-free Metamucil products have aspartame, that left me with the Metamucil with sugar. But with sugar-sensitive high triglycerides and a desire for a nightly glass of wine, it seemed sugared Metamucil might not be a great choice.

Metamucil_OriginalSmoothSo I dug a bit more and found ONE Metamucil product with neither sugar nor aspartame. Called Metamucil Original Smooth, it was just what I was looking for. Oh, except for the taste. While I did not despise the ‘wheat-y’ taste as much as others on the internet seem to, it was certainly not a flavor I wanted to wake up to every morning.

So I started thinking about how Going Lo-Co reader Eileen makes a cholesterol-loweirng grapefruit juice / Metamucil smoothie: info here.) Smoothies are too much work for me, so I looked around on the web and found many who said they mixed the Original Smooth with juice. Which is what my Mom does too – she mixes Metamucil with diluted orange juice. But OJ is just a lot of sugar with no cholesterol-lowering benefit so that did not appeal. Then it hit me: what if I combined grapefruit and orange juice?**

This morning, I stirred up an inaugural glass of Going Lo-Co Metamucil Elixir. To make it, I combined 1 teaspoon of Metamucil Original Smooth with 4 ounces of grapefruit juice, splashed in some (about 1 oz) orange juice to cut the tartness of the grapefruit juice, then topped it off with about 2 oz of water.  After a vigorous stir, I guzzled it.

I am pleased to say that I really liked it. Well, as much as one likes these things.

The taste is decent AND unlike sugared Metamucil, my version delivers potassium AND the blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglyceride lowering properties of grapefruit juice (see Grapefruit Pros and Cons for more info.)

Then I estimated the nutritional value for my Going Lo-Co Metamucil Elixir. My concoction does have more calories and sugar than sugared Metamucil, but I’m willing to accept those extra 30 calories and 4 grams of sugar for the better taste AND potassium AND the cholesterol-lowering benefits of grapefruit juice. Here’s how they compare:

Metamucil Grapefruit OJ
If you don’t take ANY medications, give my Going Lo-Co Metamucil mix a whirl. If you do take medication – any medication – read message below: and do NOT try this unless you’ve consulted with your doctor.

** VERY IMPORTANT:  do NOT try this ‘recipe’ — in fact, do NOT drink any grapefruit juice — if you are on statins or other medications. Specifically, do NOT eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice if you take Lipitor or any other statin medication to lower cholesterol without speaking first to your doctor.  Same grapefruit warning exists if you take other types of medications that can also interact with grapefruit juice, including drugs for blood pressure, heart rhythm, depression, anxiety, HIV, immunosuppression, allergies, impotence, and seizures.  It is dangerous to start eating grapefruit (or drinking grapefruit juice) if you take any of these medications – unless you speak to your doctor first.

Share

Honey Dijon Arctic Char

Last week, I got some bad news which I’m hoping I can turn into good news.

The bad news: my cholesterol has hit a personal high of 267 but more concerning, my triglycerides skyrocketed to 253 (‘goal’ is lower than 150 … and in the 10 lab results I’ve tracked since 2002 my triglycerides have NEVER been over 200.)

Also, I now have some “mild kidney insufficiency” which may be related to what’s driving my triglycerides sky-high: a) a diet too high in sugar, carbs and alcohol; and b) not enough exercise.

It’s this – the poor diet and exercise – that I’m hoping I can turn into good news. Which I may be able to, because when I really considered my actions over the past few months I was appalled. In fact, I was surprised and chagrined to realize that since my October 2015 knee surgery I’ve not jumped back onto my near-daily exercise routine (not even close) … and am binge/stress eating chocolate…and wine. Oh, and my new favorite starch, baked sweet potatoes, is probably not helping.

More on the high triglycerides and kidney problem in a more medically-focused post (once I do a bit more research and discuss more fully with my doctor.) With my medical questions stressing me out and wine not the right choice, I decided on Saturday to start righting the medical ship with a lo-co recipe review.

So we went grocery shopping over the weekend and yesterday I made the only salad dressing I like (mustard vinaigrette a la David Tanis – see my love salad post or see recipe below). Then my husband and I grilled bok choy, baked brussels sprouts, and steamed green beans so we have vegetables to easily toss into dinners this week. He then grilled a steak (I know, right?) while I made a new fish recipe that was AMAZING and so very easy: Honey Dijon Arctic Char.

HoneyDijonArcticCharThis fish recipe is a snap – as for the fish itself, if you prefer salmon go for it: both salmon and char are ‘meaty’ fish so they hold up well on the grill. I whipped up the marinade in five minutes and let it absorb on a plate for just 20 minutes instead of 30. We (OK, my husband) grilled it skin side down on medium heat for 5 minutes, and it was an easy flip for another 2-3 minutes for perfectly cooked fish. As you can see, I served it with low-glycemic quinoa (instead of the baked sweet potato that’s been my go to side for the past six months) and baked brussels sprouts and string beans.  Plus ONE glass of wine (I wanted two but…)

Having never made this before AND despising honey, I wasn’t sure I’d like this so I didn’t bother measuring the ingredients. Thus, I was absolutely astonished at how tasty this was. Click the link for recipe details (and for ingredients for 4), which I’ve cut roughly in half, and summarized here:

Honey Dijon Arctic Char / Salmon: for 2-3 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 large filet of arctic char or salmon, skin on – about 3/4 pound (for 2-3 people, or to have leftovers!)
  • 1/8 cup dijon mustard (I didn’t really measure this)
  • 1/8 cup honey (or this)
  • 1 TB extra virgin olive oil (or this)
  • 2 cloves of garlic – supposed to be minced, I put through garlic press
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme (again, no measuring)
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper (didn’t measure, used black pepper)
  • juice of half lemon (plus more for serving, if desired)

Directions:

  • Combine mustard, honey, oil, garlic, thyme, lemon juice, salt, and pepper. Using a spoon, coat fillet (both sides) with mixture (if not enough for skin, just throw some olive oil under it). Cover dish with plastic wrap and place into refrigerator for 30 minutes (I just let it sit on counter instead for 20 minutes).
  • On grill pre-heated to about medium, place fish, skin side down (on a fish screen) and cook for 5 minutes. Carefully, turn fish and cook for an additional 3-5 minutes. (It’ll  be done – you can tell it is if the flesh of the fish no longer appears shiny and flakes easily). Remove from grill and serve – with a little extra lemon juice if desired.

Thank you to Derrick Riches on bbq.about.com for the recipe and inspiration. I cannot WAIT to have this fish again tonight. And maybe again for lunch tomorrow – in a salad with my homemade mustard vinaigrette – recipe again here:

Mustard Vinaigrette a la David Tanis– for a TRIPLE recipe: 2 TB Dijon mustard, 6 TB Sherry Vinegar, some finely grated garlic (I use 2 cloves – the recipe asks for 1 1/2 teaspoons) and 9 TB EVOO, salt and pepper to taste. To make: whisk together mustard, vinegar and garlic. Whisk in olive oil. Season with salt & pepper.  Pour into carafe and refrigerate.

Share

Tangy, Healthy, Homemade Yogurt

Two things happened mid-February that messed with my decade-long half-bagel with smidge of cream cheese and slice of lox breakfast habit.

  1. My fabulous local delicatessen can no longer get the nirvana-like H&H bagels from NYC (yes, I know the real H&H closed years ago but the ‘other’ H&H bagels are great too). And I despise their CT-made replacement bagels. DESPISE.
  2. In the NYT, I read a Melissa Clark article about making homemade yogurt and became obsessed – especially because there was a kitchen gadget I could buy.

I tried to be more open — to embrace change and learn to love the new bagels. I could not. I then bought a dozen bagels from a deli in NYC and brought them home on the train. Nope. Tasted right but they are the size of a softball and I hate that.

Yes, I am picky. I know I am not flexible. It’s sad but I’m just not. I’d say I’m working on it, but at least food-wise, it’d be a lie.

So what’s a non-food-flexible girl to do? Well, that’s the upshot of the story because Melissa Clark’s homemade yogurt recipe was a revelation.

When I read How to Make Yogurt at Home, I was immediately intrigued by her statement that it’s both simple to make and delicious – far more delicious than store-bought and since I’m not a huge fan of yogurt I thought I should try it. And bonus: my doctor wants me to consume more calcium and, um, ice cream is not on the lo-co calcium list.

Then it got fun. As I re-read Ms. Clark’s article, I realized she inserted a mystery into her story. And who doesn’t love a good mystery:

“I fell in love with a whole-milk yogurt that was so smooth, thick and milky tasting that it blew away anything I’d had before. Naturally, it was made by a Brooklyn artisan, it cost a fortune, and it was in such high demand that the fancy shop where it was sold was often out of stock.”

Finding out what yogurt she was obsessed with became my obsession.

After a ridiculous number of hours reading yogurt reviews and searching online, I did not know the answer but narrowed it down to either The White Moustache or Sohha Savory Yogurt.  In NYC for the weekend, I could not find Sohha but did find The White Moustache, so I bought one of the single-serve jars for a whopping $6.

Then I re-read the ‘simple’ recipe and started laughing. Sure, it’s simple, if you have a lot of patience. But I’m neither flexible nor patient (at least I know my faults, right?)  Her two “tips” about how easy it was to make yogurt were what prompted me to immediately buy a yogurt maker.  To me, these did not sound easy:

Tip #1: “…rub an ice cube over the inside bottom of the pot before adding the milk. This keeps it from scorching as it heats.” (For me, this reads like a guarantee of a scorched pot and is thus to be avoided at all costs.)

Tip #2: “I’ve tried placing it in a turned-off oven with the oven light on, in a corner swathed in a heating pad, on the countertop wrapped in a big towel, and tucked on the top of the fridge. They all worked, though the warmer the spot, the more quickly the milk fermented.” (OMG…too many options / too many ways I could go wrong, so, um, no.)

When I told my sister what I was going to do, she said, “Oh, making yogurt at home is easy, you just cook it and leave it somewhere warm.”  Or something to that effect.  So I guess these ‘tips’ would act as ‘tips’ for some (most?) people, but for me it led me straight to the internet.

Where I realized there was one final challenge with making yogurt: timing. The entire process takes at least 18 hours. While none of it’s hard (except for that scorched pot part) and none of that time is actually active work, it does mean you need to plan out exactly when you start or you’ll need to get up at 3am to jam it into the refrigerator. And that’s a big no for me. Armed now with information, I searched on Amazon.

Cuisinart Electronic Yogurt MakerFirst I bought an “InstantPot”. Too many issues to enumerate so let me say, “just don’t believe the reviews; it’s not good as a yogurt maker.” I immediately returned it and bought the fabulous Cuisinart Electronic Yogurt Maker with Automatic Cooling.  At $99 it was not a small purchase but I’ve been thrilled with it – you just mix 2 cups of organic 2% milk (for lo-co yogurt I’m using 2%) with 3-4 TB of the White Moustache plain yogurt, turn it on for 12 hours and when it’s done, it then keeps it cool for 12 more hours – so at any normal time of day, you can remove it to the refrigerator. To me, that’s worth the cost of the pretty slim, nice-looking appliance!

Not only is this truly easy, but it makes yogurt that’s rich, creamy and tangy. With NO sugar, that tangy taste takes a bit of getting used to, but I’m trying (look at me, being flexible after all!)  I add fresh berries and mash them up to give the yogurt a bit of color and also a handful of granola for some crunch and texture.

The only problem is – I am eating it for lunch, not breakfast. Turns out I really crave hot (or at least, not cold) for breakfast.  So I’m still eating the last of my NYC frozen bagels (can’t let them go to waste, right?) and trying to gear myself up to try yogurt for breakfast.

If you are more flexible than me (a low bar indeed) and/or like yogurt for breakfast but would prefer a tangier, no-sugar option at a fraction of the cost of buying individual serve yogurts, give Melissa Clark’s recipe a whirl.

Share

Hearty Mushroom-Spinach Soup

While I am not usually a fan of soup for dinner, my husband is, and this month I found two soup recipes that looked hearty enough to possibly satisfy. Plus they both had the alluring added bonus of “requiring” the purchase of a new kitchen gadget. Though there’s barely room in my ‘magic closet,’ I could not resist.

So two weeks ago, I made New York Times “Recipes For Health” columnist Martha Rose Shulman’s Winter Vegetable Soup With Turnips, Carrots, Potatoes and Leeks – because it looked tasty and required a food mill, a kitchen implement I’ve often wondered about. More on that adventure in another post.

Last night, I was tempted by a recipe that appeared that day (oh the spontaneity!) in the NYT. I always have good luck with Melissa Clark recipes, so I went right on out and purchased an immersion blender and ingredients for her Mushroom-Spinach Soup With Middle Eastern Spices.

The immersion blender was a bust. Literally. I need to find and buy a different brand; luckily I have an old fashioned blender, so that saved the day. Which was good because this recipe was delicious – both very tasty and hearty enough for the not-soup-lover in me. Beyond a new lo-co meal, the whole reason I tried it (besides the fact that I love mushrooms) was Ms. Clark’s quite accurate description:

Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times

Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times

“This is a very hearty, chunky soup filled with bits of browned mushroom and silky baby spinach. A combination of sweet and savory spices – cinnamon, coriander and cumin – gives it a deep, earthy richness.”

Sounds good, right? It was. It even looks hearty, as you can see in this picture that accompanied the recipe.

The picture and description enticed me to try the recipe – to run right out and buy the ingredients, actually.

But I have two quibbles with the recipe as Ms. Clark published it.

First, it does NOT take one hour. It took me 1.5 hours – and I didn’t even dice shallots.  So if you are going to try this recipe, give yourself at least 90 minutes. AT LEAST. Nothing’s hard, it just takes time.

Second, once the soup is cooked, step 4 of the recipe is not quite accurate. The recipe says, “Using an immersion blender or food processor, coarsely purée soup.” After my immersion blender mishap, I poured the soup – nearly all of it – into my blender and hit puree. Once back in the soup pot, I realized the recipe was not accurate for use of an – oh wait – she said food processor, not old fashioned blender.  My bad.

OK, so what I was going to say is that the directions should say to purée only half of the soup or something to that effect – because Ms. Clark’s soup has some beautiful big chunks of mushrooms in it post-puréeing (and mine did too, before I puréed it – see picture below on the left.) But puréeing pulverized nearly all of my mushroom chunks (see photo on right). I was a little sad about that – but now see that was my fault (though actually, I’m not entirely convinced that if you put ALL of the soup in a food processor and coarsely puréed it, you’d still have some nice big mushroom slices. A guess on my part, but I still think you should not food processor purée ALL of it!).

MushroomSoup2

Pre-purée: looks like recipe pic!

MushroomSoupBlended

Post blender: few mushroom chunks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sadly that was not my only error. I also forgot to buy shallots. This recipe calls for 1/2 pound of diced shallots – that is a LOT of shallots: far more than the 1 head I had on hand. Instead, I used fresh pre-diced onions and diced them further. (And still, it took me 1.5 hours to make this soup without peeling and dicing a huge number of shallots!)

MushroomSoupFinalMy mistake(s) notwithstanding, this was still delicious. It does have a vaguely Indian flavor profile – so if that’s not your deal, you may prefer different spices. You can see from my terrible picture that I served this as suggested, with a dollop of plain greek yogurt. Along with a nice loaf of fresh French bread, both my husband and I enjoyed this dinner. It’s a tasty lo-co meal that’s a great change of pace from a meat-based meal, and to my surprise this was a totally satisfying dinner. Plus, it’s easy to make on a weeknight – as long as you have the time for and don’t mind dicing.

So, another Melissa Clark recipe win.

I’ll let you know if the immersion blender works better than a regular blender when the one I ordered from Amazon arrives!  I hope it’s not too big; my magic closet is filled to the ceiling. Literally.

Share

Peas For The Holidays

Looking for something green – and healthy – for your holiday table? Have you considered peas?

Yes, peas. Don’t scoff. I know you want to. I know I did. But this past Sunday I was at a dinner party where my friend Tina served up an outrageous pea dish.

Outrageous. Pea. Dish.

Nope. Not an oxymoron.

To be honest, mashed peas is a dish I had never before eaten, much less cooked. Frankly, the idea of mashed peas did not appeal. Actually it had never even occurred to me.

But Tina’s mashed peas were a revelation.

Healthy and delicious, check. Great for those of us leading lo-co lifestyles. But more than that, this dish is festive and fun. This recipe delivers peas that are a wonderfully vibrant green. So tantalizing were these peas in both taste and appearance that I plan to serve them for Christmas Eve and/or Christmas dinner.

My friend Tina found the recipe on Alex’s Kitchen column on House Beautiful.  The recipe is titled, Alex Hitz’s Roast Leg of Lamb and Mashed Peas.

Mashed Peas – serves 4-5 (recipe says serves 8)

  • 1 package frozen peas (16 oz.) – but see notes below
  • 1 package frozen peas and pearl onions (16 oz.) – but see notes below
  • 2 tablespoons heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons salted butter, melted
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/8 tsp. ground black pepper
  1. In two separate small saucepans (or in a microwave) thaw the frozen peas, and the frozen peas and pearl onions over low heat until just warm.
  2. In a food processor fitted with a metal blade, puree the peas and heavy cream until smooth. Do not puree the peas and pearl onions.
  3. In a medium-size mixing bowl, stir the pureed peas into the whole peas and pearl onions, along with the melted butter, salt, and pepper. Transfer mixture to a covered baking dish and reheat in a 350 degree oven.

Tina’s Cooking Notes:

  • This is not enough for eight people. To adjust, puree one package of peas and then add 1 1/2 packages of peas and most of a whole package of pearl onions. (Note: this is the adjustment my friend Tina made; you could probably make alternate adjustments but I can vouch that this adjustment was excellent.)
  • If you do not have salted butter, just add a bit more salt.
  • For fewer pots to clean and ease in general, thaw the peas in the microwave instead of using two saucepans.

While it’s not ideal that this dish uses both heavy cream and butter, the quantities of these high fat ingredients are small. In fact, compared with other high-fat holiday side dishes, I’d argue this mashed peas recipe is quite a good lo-co holiday option.

I’m headed out to the store to buy peas, pearl onions and heavy cream so I can test this side dish out pre-Christmas Eve. I’ll let you know how it turns out.

Share